‘The Roanoke Girls’ by Amy Engel

When Lane learns that her cousin Allegra is missing, she is forced to return to her family home at Roanoke. As a result, she reflects on the first and last time she came to Roanoke, one eventful summer, twenty years ago. The Roanoke Girls is a trashy novel. And when I say that, please bear… Continue reading ‘The Roanoke Girls’ by Amy Engel

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‘The Midwich Cuckoos’ by John Wyndham

Nothing ever happens in Midwich. The sleepy country village is the epitome of English ordinariness, so when residents Richard and Janet Gayford are prevented by police from returning after a weekend away, they are understandably eager to discover the cause of these highly unusual circumstances. It transpires that, Sleeping Beauty-like, the whole town has fallen… Continue reading ‘The Midwich Cuckoos’ by John Wyndham

‘The Birds and Other Stories’ by Daphne du Maurier

This week, I am thrilled to be featured in 2 Elizabeths, a new and exciting online literary magazine. You can read the review of Daphne du Maurier's The Birds and Other Stories which I wrote for them here.

‘White is for Witching’, by Helen Oyeyemi

Miranda Silver is very unhappy. She is also very unwell: she suffers from pica, so is repulsed by food and prefers instead to eat chalk and plastic and metal. Since the death of her mother Lily, she is finding it increasingly difficult to maintain a grasp on reality. Perhaps she just needs to get out… Continue reading ‘White is for Witching’, by Helen Oyeyemi

‘The Monk’ by Matthew Lewis

If you are one of those people who think that so-called ‘classic literature’ is boring, then The Monk is the book that will change your mind. Extraordinarily controversial when it was originally published in 1796, this sensational account of moral decline and depravity has lost none of its power to shock and appal. It’s bonkers,… Continue reading ‘The Monk’ by Matthew Lewis

‘Carrie’ by Stephen King

16-year-old Carrie White is not like other girls. Her homemade, old-fashioned clothes are odd and unflattering, her acne-ridden face is dissociated and dismal, and no wonder: at school, she is the butt of every joke, and at home, she must contend with her abusive, tyrannical, religiously fanatical ‘Momma’. But when Carrie gets her first period,… Continue reading ‘Carrie’ by Stephen King