‘The Roanoke Girls’ by Amy Engel

When Lane learns that her cousin Allegra is missing, she is forced to return to her family home at Roanoke. As a result, she reflects on the first and last time she came to Roanoke, one eventful summer, twenty years ago. The Roanoke Girls is a trashy novel. And when I say that, please bear… Continue reading ‘The Roanoke Girls’ by Amy Engel

‘Wuthering Heights’ by Emily Bronte

Mr Lockwood has rented a house on the Yorkshire moors. When he pays a visit to his landlord – a Mr Heathcliff – he is bemused by the man’s unusual household, comprised of his beautiful but beleaguered daughter-in-law, her rough and seemingly illiterate cousin, and an elderly and religiously fanatical servant. When Lockwood is forced… Continue reading ‘Wuthering Heights’ by Emily Bronte

‘A Pale View of Hills’ by Kazuo Ishiguro

Etsuko’s daughter, Keiko, has committed suicide. As she attempts to come to terms with this tragic event, Etsuko finds herself increasingly drawn into the past, to her old life in Japan, and in particular to one hot Nagasaki summer when she was newly married to her first husband, and befriended a strange woman named Sachiko…… Continue reading ‘A Pale View of Hills’ by Kazuo Ishiguro

‘The Birds and Other Stories’ by Daphne du Maurier

This week, I am thrilled to be featured in 2 Elizabeths, a new and exciting online literary magazine. You can read the review of Daphne du Maurier's The Birds and Other Stories which I wrote for them here.

‘White is for Witching’, by Helen Oyeyemi

Miranda Silver is very unhappy. She is also very unwell: she suffers from pica, so is repulsed by food and prefers instead to eat chalk and plastic and metal. Since the death of her mother Lily, she is finding it increasingly difficult to maintain a grasp on reality. Perhaps she just needs to get out… Continue reading ‘White is for Witching’, by Helen Oyeyemi

‘The Monk’ by Matthew Lewis

If you are one of those people who think that so-called ‘classic literature’ is boring, then The Monk is the book that will change your mind. Extraordinarily controversial when it was originally published in 1796, this sensational account of moral decline and depravity has lost none of its power to shock and appal. It’s bonkers,… Continue reading ‘The Monk’ by Matthew Lewis

Bibliotherapy

As a child, I was scared a lot. When I was seven we moved to a big, old house near a military airfield, and I would regularly convince myself that the planes I heard flying overhead at night were alien spaceships, that the scuffling birds in the sloped walls of my attic bedroom were the… Continue reading Bibliotherapy